BC Review of historical novel Providence

I was delighted to have the opportunity to review historian Valerie Green’s debut novel, Providence, for The British Columbia Review. An author of over 20 non-fiction titles, Green deftly blends fact and fiction in this vivid portrayal of colonial British Columbia. Set in the mid-19th-century, the engaging story captures the spirit of hope and desperation …

Consumed by Ink review

Trappings received an insightful review in Nova Scotia by Naomi MacKinnon. Shining a light on Canadian women’s history, she appreciates the coast-to-coast ties of the Wentworth Wallace family, who fled Halifax under scandal to start over in BC. In her words: You don’t have to be a history buff to enjoy this book … Some …

Trappings in The Ormsby Review

Trappings was reviewed by historical author Valerie Green in The Ormsby Review, a journal of in-depth coverage of BC’s books. Trappings takes place in the early Colonial days of British Columbia and excellently portrays those challenging times — most especially for women. Vanessa Winn’s vivid scenes are beautifully depicted… Kate’s tragic story is presented by …

Blog review of Trappings

Vancouver blogger and mom, Bonnie Way, reviews Trappings. Around a sturdy structure of historical facts, she wove a beautiful tapestry of emotions and motives, making Kate come alive for modern readers… Whether you’re a lover of historical fiction or curious to know more about British Columbia, I recommend both The Chief Factor’s Daughter and Trappings. Her …

The Chief Factor’s Daughter featured in Booksmack

The Chief Factor’s Daughter was a favourite pick at the Greater Victoria Public Library’s Booksmack event at the Belfry this spring. Librarians give speed reviews of their favourite books. This looks like a fun event, where librarians also showcase their sense of humour! I’ll get to one in future… http://gvpl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Belfry-Booksmack-April-24-2017.pdf

Where Fact and Fiction Overlap

Review of The Private Journal of Captain G.H. Richards: The Vancouver Island Survey (1860-1862), mentions an overlap with The Chief Factor’s Daughter, in the character of Lieutenant R.C. Mayne. http://canlit.ca/reviews/evangelizing_and_exploring Captain Richards’ journal offers additional historical insights through supplemented journal excerpts from another junior officer, John Gowlland.